Physical therapist sees dream become reality | News


Ever since he finished college, Troy Herrman has worked in physical therapy.

It’s the profession he’s loved and enjoyed, simply for the aspect of helping people heal. Herrman wouldn’t have had it any other way for the past 18 years.

“I think the most rewarding aspect of physical therapy is watching someone become themselves again,” Herrman said. “We deal with individuals when they are hurting, they’re down, and it’s not their normal self. You get to work with these individuals and build them up and watch them improve. In the process they become a healthier version of themselves. That’s special when that happens.”

Along that path, Herrman has had a dream of opening his own business. After a month of putting a new work place together, he finally was able to see a goal he set for himself years ago come to fruition. On Monday morning, his own business, Herrman Physical Therapy and Wellness opened to the public. It is located at 2707 Broadway Ave. in Hays.

Up until late Easter evening Sunday, Herrman and family members — including his father-in-law and brother-in-law — worked to get the place ready to be open.

“They’ve been a huge help,” Hermann said of his family. “I couldn’t have done it without them.”

A native of Ensign, Herrman graduated from Fort Hays State University, then from the University of Kansas in 1999. He and his family have been in Hays for the past 10 years. He worked at Hays Medical Center as a staff physical therapist, then managed the outpatient rehabilitation department for four years. In the next six years he was a physical therapist at Koerner Chiropractic.

Through the years, Herrman has built strong relationships through work and confidence in himself. He never let the hope of owning his own business elude him. The timing to do it now seemed right.

“I think the biggest thing I’ve gained as far as confidence is just that ability to communicate and bond with individuals, so that they know, ‘Hey, I know I’m going to be OK again,’ ” Herrman said.

The business is staffed by just himself and his front area assistant Mariah Legleiter. Herrman plans to eventually employ at least a few other individuals. For now though, it’s just about establishing the business and relationships with patients. Down the road everything else, he hopes, will fall into place.

“I want people to know they have a choice for physical therapy,” Herrman said. “When patients come here, they will see me every time and it will be a positive experience.”



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Patients Can Now Do Physical Therapy Through Virtual Reality


Patients Can Now Do Physical Therapy Through Virtual Reality

VR Physio lets people participate in physical therapy without having to go to an office or have someone come to their home

Even with the most successful surgeries, post-op care is essential in ensuring a successful recovery. Physical therapy is often prescribed to patients in order to get them back into good physical shape. However, appointments are often hard to book and good physical therapists can be difficult to find. Therefore, Israel-based company VRPhysio was created to get patients access to the physical therapy they need.

Patients have the opportunity to wear a VR headset to strengthen weakened parts of their body. All of the exercises are immersive and fun, providing a way for patients to really get into the movements. For example, patients might be tasked to fill barrels with water to exercise their necks. The technology also utilizes algorithms to track a patient’s body, monitoring changes during trainings. At the end of each session, patients have access detailed summary reports available through VRPhysio’s cloud service. Therefore, progress is easily tracked.

This immersive experience not only makes physical therapy a lot more enjoyable, but also more accessible for patients. They have the opportunity to continue to do exercises at home as well, using a smartphone-based headset.

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VRPhysio Enables Patients To Do Physical Therapy In Virtual Reality


Eran Orr needed physical therapy, but he found out the hard way that it wasn’t easy to do. Physical therapy is always a big part of rehabilitation, but no one wants to do the exercises. It’s hard to book an appointment with a good therapist. And it’s hard to know what is really working.

So Orr founded VRPhysio, a Tel Aviv, Israel-based company that enables patients to do physical therapy in VR. VR Physio is one of about 90 augmented reality and VR companies in Israel. The company was one of a handful of Israeli companies that presented at an event hosted by Orange Fab Accelerator and the government of Israel’s economic mission in San Francisco.

The company has created a clinical solution that is registered as a measurement device with the Food and Drug Administration. The PC-based VR platform can be used to help patients deal with such ailments as whiplash from car accidents. In a demo, Orr showed how you can — while wearing a VR headset — look upward at some barrels. You fill the barrels with water, exercising your neck. On average, whiplash victims have to go to 30 physical therapy sessions, Orr said.

“We take the physical therapy protocols and put them in VR, measure them, and give you feedback,” he said. “We can see the points in the exercise where the patient hits the pain points.”

Above: VRPhysio helps patients rehabilitate themselves in VR.

Image Credit: VRPhysio

That helps whiplash victims perform one of the common therapy exercises, looking up. And it does so in a way that is more engaging and fun than a boring physical exercise, Orr said in an interview with VentureBeat. In another game, you pop balloons with a sword. Over time, Orr wants to expand to other kinds of treatments for other parts of the body.

You can use whatever VR headset you want. Orr said that he hopes insurance companies will pay for VR therapy, as it can replace inefficient in-person physical therapy sessions. And VRPhysio captures analytics data on your sessions. That tells the doctor whether you are performing the exercises and whether you are showing improvement in your ability to complete the exercises.

“We get four gigabytes of data from a session,” Orr said. “We get data on how you are performing, and we can pass that on to the doctor or the insurance company.”

Those analytics could be important in helping doctors decide whether an athlete is fit enough to return to play after recovering from an injury, Orr said. The company has been testing the VR Physio platform at a hospital in Boston. It also went through the MassChallenge accelerator program.

Orr found that he needed physical therapy himself after finishing a routine flight in his F-16 fighter jet squadron in the Israeli Air Force. He felt pain in his right hand that radiated to his neck. He couldn’t sleep or hold his child, and he was grounded from active flight duty.

It turned out he had a herniated neck, and he learned that it could have been prevented if he had done preventive workouts before flying. He started a program to help other pilots in the Israeli Air Force. And then he started his company, which raised $750,000 in crowdfunding.

Orr hopes that game companies and other software companies will create games that work with the VRPhysio platform.

“The games have to be attractive,” he said. “One way is to make it a family game. Your child, say, won’t be able to move forward to the next level unless you also move forward.”

The company has 13 people, including 10 in Israel and three in Boston. VRPhysio is planning to raise some additional money. The company is charging $300 for the product, and it plans to sell the units to physical therapists.

Here’s a video of VR Physio’s proposition for physical therapy in VR.

This post by Dean Takahashi originally appeared on VentureBeat.

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VRPhysio enables patients to do physical therapy in virtual reality | VentureBeat | AR/VR


Evan Orr needed physical therapy, but he found out the hard way that it wasn’t easy to do. Physical therapy is always a big part of rehabilitation, but no one wants to do the exercises. It’s hard to book an appointment with a good therapist. And it’s hard to know what is really working.

So Orr founded VRPhysio, a Tel Aviv, Israel-based company that enables patients to do physical therapy in VR. VR Physio is one of about 90 augmented reality and VR companies in Israel. The company was one of a handful of Israeli companies that presented at an event hosted by Orange Fab Accelerator and the government of Israel’s economic mission in San Francisco.

The company has created a clinical solution that is registered as a measurement device with the Food and Drug Administration. The PC-based VR platform can be used to help patients deal with such ailments as whiplash from car accidents. In a demo, Orr showed how you can — while wearing a VR headset — look upward at some barrels. You fill the barrels with water, exercising your neck. On average, whiplash victims have to go to 30 physical therapy sessions, Orr said.

“We take the physical therapy protocols and put them in VR, measure them, and give you feedback,” he said. “We can see the points in the exercise where the patient hits the pain points.”

Above: VRPhysio helps patients rehabilitate themselves in VR.

Image Credit: VRPhysio

That helps whiplash victims perform one of the common therapy exercises, looking up. And it does so in a way that is more engaging and fun than a boring physical exercise, Orr said in an interview with VentureBeat. In another game, you pop balloons with a sword. Over time, Orr wants to expand to other kinds of treatments for other parts of the body.

You can use whatever VR headset you want. Orr said that he hopes insurance companies will pay for VR therapy, as it can replace inefficient in-person physical therapy sessions. And VRPhysio captures analytics data on your sessions. That tells the doctor whether you are performing the exercises and whether you are showing improvement in your ability to complete the exercises.

“We get four gigabytes of data from a session,” Orr said. “We get data on how you are performing, and we can pass that on to the doctor or the insurance company.”

Those analytics could be important in helping doctors decide whether an athlete is fit enough to return to play after recovering from an injury, Orr said. The company has been testing the VR Physio platform at a hospital in Boston. It also went through the MassChallenge accelerator program.

Orr found that he needed physical therapy himself after finishing a routine flight in his F-16 fighter jet squadron in the Israeli Air Force. He felt pain in his right hand that radiated to his neck. He couldn’t sleep or hold his child, and he was grounded from active flight duty.

It turned out he had a herniated neck, and he learned that it could have been prevented if he had done preventive workouts before flying. He started a program to help other pilots in the Israeli Air Force. And then he started his company, which raised $750,000 in crowdfunding.

Orr hopes that game companies and other software companies will create games that work with the VRPhysio platform.

“The games have to be attractive,” he said. “One way is to make it a family game. Your child, say, won’t be able to move forward to the next level unless you also move forward.”

The company has 13 people, including 10 in Israel and three in Boston. VRPhysio is planning to raise some additional money. The company is charging $300 for the product, and it plans to sell the units to physical therapists.

Here’s a video of VR Physio’s proposition for physical therapy in VR.



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