USPH) Stock Technicals Hit Inflection Point

 

Decision Time: U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) Stock Technicals Hit Inflection Point

 

U.S. Physical Therapy Inc technical rating as of

2017-04-23

(USPH Price of Stock at Publication: $64.2)


Decision Time: U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) now sits in the perhaps the most difficult technical position — the stock has no urgency in its direction and that has left it at an inflection point. Watch the key moving average levels that we discuss below and further, watch the stochastics, technical oscillators and momentum readings for any kind of hint to direction.

The company has a three bull momentum rating which indicates an inflection point. It may seem obvious, but this is the time to put the stock on alert — a meaningful move in either direction now will likely swing momentum into a channel that could be decidedly up or down.

 
With the current stock price and the moving averages showing signs of indecision, any consecutive day stock move in either direction will likely push the stock into a bearish or bullish momentum channel that could persist for the short-term. This is a critical inflection point.

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USPH is down -6.6% over the last three months and up +4.6% over the last six months. The stock price is up +29.1% over the last year. The current stock price is $64.2.

The technical rating goes from a rating of one, the weakest upside technical, to a rating of five,
the highest upside technical. This is strictly focusing on price and technical — that means we focus on real-time stock price movement and then position it relative to the simple moving averages. To make the technical rating meaningful, the moving averages are also compared to each other.

If you’re looking for the simplest version of this, here it is — when the short-term moving averages are above the long-term moving averages that indicates relative strength in the technical. Then see the current price relative to the highest moving average and you will have a “back of the envelope” technical indicator in your back pocket for any stock at any time.

The blending and weighting of numbers above created the technical model built by Capital Market Laboratories (www.CMLviz.com).
Note the stock price at publication ($64.2), since the technical rating is based on intraday stock prices.
 

Technicals   |   Support: 63.15   |   Resistance: 65.35   

 

Golden Cross Alert: The 50 day MA is now above the 200 day moving average.

As we noted above — the back of the envelope rule here is that when shorter-term moving averages move above the longer-term ones, momentum is building. We have that right now.

Swing Death Cross Alert: The short-term 10 day moving average is now below the 50 day moving average.

Recall that when we see the shortest-term moving average (10-day in this case) fall below any other moving average (50-day in this case), it indicates weakening momentum.

We can set aside oscillators and stochastics, we are simply in no man’s land: U.S. Physical Therapy Inc has a three bull technical rating which puts it at an inflection point because while it’s trading above its 10 day moving average, its trading below both the 50- and 200 day simple moving averages and the 10 day moving average is below the 50 day moving average (“swing death cross”). The fact that the stock is up 0.31% today and that the stockprice is above the 10-day moving average puts it an a critical inflection point.
We now turn to the actual numbers driving this rating:

U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) rating statistics:

10-day moving average: $63.97

50-day moving average: $69.15

200-day moving average: $65.29

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According to Pablo Lopez’s mom Veronica, her son has been positively ebullient since he got his new car. He’ll even wake her, she says, excited to get behind the wheel and take it for a spin.

A kid being excited about his ride isn’t exactly news, until you consider a few key factors. First, Pablo isn’t yet 16. Second, Pablo suffers from Spina Bifida, a birth defect resulting in deformation in the vertebrae and spinal column. As a result, Pablo’s lower trunk and legs are extremely weak.

The car that he’s been cruising around in isn’t of a make or model you’ll find on any showroom floor. Rather, it’s an important tool helping Pablo build his strength while having fun. And it was all made possible by a student-led organization called GoBabyGo@IU.

“GoBabyGo is program that modifies electric children’s vehicles for kiddos with disabilities of all kinds,” says Michael Mohr, a Ph. D. student in the Indiana University Physical Therapy Program at IUPUI and the group’s co-founder. “The idea is to turn them into cost-effective therapeutic vehicles for these kids.”

When a child is referred to GoBabyGo@IU, which is an offshoot of a program started at the University of Delaware, their needs are assessed and goals are set by a professional physical therapist. The GoBabyGo team of physical therapy and engineering students then go about designing a vehicle that will challenge target areas. That could mean a modified seat that encourages standing and leg strength or a dual starter/accelerator system to hone coordination. And, thanks to generous donations and volunteer support, GoBabyGo is able to offer these vehicles free of charge.

Dr. Sara Davis, the primary physical therapist for GoBabyGo@IU, says seeing the excitement and motivation the children gain from their newfound independence has been incredibly rewarding.

“Physical therapy, especially in the pediatric realm is predominately very clinical,” explains Davis. “It gets monotonous for children. By having some kind of an alternative vehicle or some other way to participate in therapy, it gives them a whole new outlook on how to participate in therapy.”

The benefits of physical therapy are not limited merely to structural improvements in a child’s body, says Davis, but have far-reaching effects on the whole of the person. Crawling, for example, necessitates the use of both sides of the body and thus communication between both sides of the brain. And, when a child is mobile, they can explore, and learn more about, their world.

Children also benefit from the increased interaction with their peers that GoBabyGo vehicles grant them. The freedom to play allows them to form bonds and friendship, build trust and cultivate interpersonal skills.

Davis happily notes that Pablo’s new ride has been turning heads and made him the toast of his school when the GoBabyGo team delivered it. “He absolutely had the biggest smile on his face. He wanted to go show every teacher what he was doing, how he was standing, how he was driving the car and all of his friends wanted to see it. They all wanted to go for a ride.”

 

GoBabyGo@IU co-founders Michael Mohr and Andrew Wiseman working on a modified car.

IUPUI physical therapy students and GoBabyGo@IU co-founders Michael Mohr and Andrew Wiseman work on Pablo’s car.

Pablo’s car has proved so popular, in fact, that he’s already had to bring it into the shop for repairs.

“He used the vehicle so much that he ended up breaking it,” says Andrew Wiseman, GoBabyGo@IU’s other co-founder, cheerfully. “We realized that we were going to need some big changes because he was putting a lot of force into it [as] he was getting stronger.”

On the horizon, Mohr, Davis, Wiseman and the rest of the GoBabyGo team are working to grow the organization such that it can fulfill the overwhelming amount of requests they’ve received. They’ve also started a series of GoBabyGo community days that bring together children, their vehicles and their families for a day of recreation and bonding, and are hoping to expand that aspect of the program.

“The social development side is kind of the end goal,” says Wiseman. “Having the kids play and interact with their peers is just amazing.”



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EXCHANGE: Therapist teaches 5½-year-old to climb stairs


“The ball is scary,” pediatric physical therapist Jillian McGriff said as she sat Hunter Trefzger, 5½, on an exercise ball.

She steadied him as he reached, one by one, to grab rings held out by his mother, Sarah, and then tossed them one at a time toward a ring stand.

“This is easy,” Hunter said, surprising McGriff.

“Thank you for being brave,” she responded.

“This is my favorite thing now,” Hunter said.

Hunter’s “favorite thing” is a challenge for any child, let alone one with dwarfism.

Hunter, of Bloomington, is a little person. For Hunter, that means he’s 36 inches tall, his arms and legs are short (he has a 10-inch inseam), his center of gravity is lower, he’s not physically proportionate and his speech is slightly impaired.

Thanks to therapy, his mother and his therapist at Marcfirst in Normal — where he was receiving physical therapy on March 20 — think he will be ready for kindergarten in August.

That almost didn’t happen. He was without therapy for six months after Easterseals Central Illinois cut ongoing physical, occupational and speech therapy for children on Medicaid and Medicaid managed care because of increasing state mandates and low Medicaid reimbursement; about 100 children lost services.

“I wasn’t necessarily mad at Easterseals,” Sarah Trefzger said. “I was mad at the state of Illinois. How could people leading the state of Illinois let it get so bad? How could the state let it get so bad for people who are fragile?”

Trefzger doesn’t care which politicians are at fault. She cares that her son and others on Medicaid and medically fragile are among those paying the price.

Hunter resumed physical therapy in February at Marcfirst’s SPICE (Services for Parent Infant and Child Education) program. But he’s on a waiting list to resume occupational and speech therapy.

“It’s not just about Hunter,” Trefzger said. “It’s also about the hundreds of other kids being affected because they need services and aren’t getting them.”

Marcfirst’s SPICE program has added 60 to 65 children for therapy services (bringing the caseload of children receiving ongoing services up to 212) and hired two physical therapists (including McGriff), a feeding therapist, three speech pathologists and a licensed clinical social worker, in part because of the cut at Easterseals, said Marcfirst CEO Laura Furlong and SPICE Director Christy Kosharek. Some of the therapists are full time, some are part time, and some, like McGriff, had been with Easterseals, Furlong said.

The other children may be getting therapy elsewhere or may be going without services for the time being.

“We have about 50 kids now waiting for services and about half had been receiving services at Easterseals,” Kosharek said.

“We want all children to receive services, regardless of the family’s ability to pay,” Kosharek said. “We are pleased to provide services but it’s placing a financial strain on us.”

Hunter was born on Nov. 3, 2011, with achondroplasia — the most common form of dwarfism — a genetic condition that results in disproportionately short arms and legs.

He has had 40 surgeries. A major one, when he was 5 months old, was a tracheostomy — a tube inserted into his windpipe to open the restricted airway and enable breathing.

When he was a year old, he had spinal decompression surgery so he wouldn’t be paralyzed from the neck down. At 3½, he had surgery to pull his tongue forward so it wouldn’t block his airway while he was sleeping.

“That allowed them to remove the trach,” his mother said.

When he began physical, occupational, speech/feeding and developmental therapy at the Easterseals Bloomington center, 2404 E. Empire St., Bloomington, at 9 months of age, “he needed 100 percent support,” his mother said. “He couldn’t sit up. He couldn’t roll. He couldn’t hold his head up.”

“He couldn’t control his own body,” said McGriff, who has been Hunter’s physical therapist since then. “We worked with him to hold his own head up, to sit independently, to crawl and to walk.”

“They were phenomenal,” Trefzger said. “Hunter would not be the person he is today if he didn’t receive therapy.”

But last May 25, Easterseals Central Illinois announced the cut, scheduled to take effect within 90 days.

“The reason was because the state changed the requirement regarding the amount of administrative work required for reimbursement,” President Gina Mandros explained. “The amount of reimbursement didn’t reflect the additional administrative operational costs.”

Medicaid reimbursement already was low, Mandros said. “It is, at best, 30 percent reimbursement,” she said.

“It’s very frustrating that there are rules beyond our control and they affect kids like Hunter,” Mandros said. “Hunter is a wonderful kid and was making amazing progress here. He was among many kids we had to let go off our caseload. It was a difficult time for everyone.”

The move resulted in a “substantial cost savings,” said Mandros, who didn’t have a dollar figure available. Easterseals Central Illinois eliminated 14 positions earlier this year.

But Easterseals retained children on Medicaid and Medicaid managed care for physical, occupational and speech therapy evaluations; for periodic check-ins and reassessments; for post-operative therapy; and for autism and cortical visual impairment services, Mandros said.

“Easterseals remains strong in our community,” Mandros said. “Our demographics may be different but we’re helping children to live, learn and thrive in our community.”

Some families called Marcfirst, which is continuing to take children on Medicaid.

Furlong said “The state budget continues to be an ongoing challenge for us.” She cited stagnant reimbursement for therapy for 10 years.

“But we’re committed as an organization to identify alternative sources of income to support all our services,” Furlong said.

Hunter lost services in late August and his mother tried to keep him active.

“For the next six months, it was sad for Hunter,” his mother recalled. “He’d ask when he could go to Easterseals to see his friends.”

In late January, McGriff was let go at Easterseals but was hired at Marcfirst SPICE and called Trefzger.

Hunter resumed physical therapy Feb. 8. “He’s making a lot of progress,” McGriff said.

“Since he resumed services, there is a marked improvement in Hunter,” his mother said.

He remains on a waiting list for occupational and speech therapy. Trefzger hopes those services resume soon. “His speech has regressed,” his mother said. “He doesn’t put his tongue in the right spot when he’s speaking. It’s difficult for him to articulate certain sounds so sometimes it’s harder for people to understand him.”

Short-term, Trefzger hopes that Hunter — who attends early childhood education at Sugar Creek Elementary School — will thrive in kindergarten.

Long-term, Trefzger wants to return to school to become an aroma therapist and wants Hunter — who will be no taller than 4 feet 6 inches — to do anything he wants to do.

“Hunter makes this a heck of a lot easier because he’s happy,” Trefzger said.

After the March 20 therapy session, Hunter was asked what he thought of therapy.

He smiled. “I like all this stuff.”

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Source: The (Bloomington) Pantagraph, http://bit.ly/2n5R3ti

___

Information from: The Pantagraph, http://www.pantagraph.com

This is an AP-Illinois Exchange story offered by The (Bloomington) Pantagraph.



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U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. (USPH) Upgraded at Zacks Investment Research


Zacks Investment Research upgraded shares of U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. (NYSE:USPH) from a sell rating to a hold rating in a research report sent to investors on Saturday.

According to Zacks, “U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. operates outpatient physical and occupational therapy clinics which provide post-operative care and treatment for a variety of orthopedic-related disorders and sports-related injuries. “

USPH has been the subject of a number of other reports. Jefferies Group LLC set a $63.00 price target on U.S. Physical Therapy and gave the company a hold rating in a research report on Saturday, March 18th. Barrington Research downgraded U.S. Physical Therapy from an outperform rating to a market perform rating in a research report on Friday, March 17th.

Shares of U.S. Physical Therapy (NYSE:USPH) traded up 0.31% during midday trading on Friday, reaching $64.20. The company had a trading volume of 43,565 shares. U.S. Physical Therapy has a 12-month low of $48.71 and a 12-month high of $78.00. The stock has a market capitalization of $803.85 million, a PE ratio of 33.26 and a beta of 0.91. The stock’s 50 day moving average is $66.71 and its 200-day moving average is $66.88.

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The company also recently announced a quarterly dividend, which will be paid on Friday, May 5th. Shareholders of record on Monday, April 17th will be given a $0.20 dividend. This is an increase from U.S. Physical Therapy’s previous quarterly dividend of $0.17. This represents a $0.80 dividend on an annualized basis and a yield of 1.25%. The ex-dividend date is Wednesday, April 12th. U.S. Physical Therapy’s dividend payout ratio (DPR) is currently 35.05%.

A number of hedge funds have recently added to or reduced their stakes in USPH. Sei Investments Co. increased its stake in U.S. Physical Therapy by 115.3% in the third quarter. Sei Investments Co. now owns 1,701 shares of the company’s stock worth $106,000 after buying an additional 911 shares in the last quarter. Acrospire Investment Management LLC increased its stake in U.S. Physical Therapy by 28.0% in the third quarter. Acrospire Investment Management LLC now owns 1,830 shares of the company’s stock worth $115,000 after buying an additional 400 shares in the last quarter. Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC purchased a new stake in U.S. Physical Therapy during the third quarter worth about $154,000. Tyers Asset Management LLC purchased a new stake in U.S. Physical Therapy during the fourth quarter worth about $166,000. Finally, Municipal Employees Retirement System of Michigan increased its stake in U.S. Physical Therapy by 1.5% in the third quarter. Municipal Employees Retirement System of Michigan now owns 2,770 shares of the company’s stock worth $174,000 after buying an additional 40 shares in the last quarter. 96.70% of the stock is owned by institutional investors and hedge funds.

About U.S. Physical Therapy

U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc, through its subsidiaries, operates outpatient physical therapy clinics that provide pre-and post-operative care, and treatment for orthopedic-related disorders, sports-related injuries, preventative care, rehabilitation of injured workers and neurological-related injuries.

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U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. (USPH) Upgraded to “Hold” by Zacks Investment Research


Zacks Investment Research upgraded shares of U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. (NYSE:USPH) from a sell rating to a hold rating in a research report report published on Saturday morning.

According to Zacks, “U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. operates outpatient physical and occupational therapy clinics which provide post-operative care and treatment for a variety of orthopedic-related disorders and sports-related injuries. “

Several other research firms have also recently weighed in on USPH. Barrington Research cut U.S. Physical Therapy from an outperform rating to a market perform rating in a report on Friday, March 17th. Jefferies Group LLC set a $63.00 price target on U.S. Physical Therapy and gave the company a hold rating in a report on Saturday, March 18th.

U.S. Physical Therapy (NYSE:USPH) traded up 0.31% on Friday, reaching $64.20. The company’s stock had a trading volume of 43,565 shares. U.S. Physical Therapy has a one year low of $48.71 and a one year high of $78.00. The stock has a market cap of $803.85 million, a P/E ratio of 33.26 and a beta of 0.91. The stock has a 50-day moving average of $66.71 and a 200-day moving average of $66.88.

COPYRIGHT VIOLATION WARNING: “U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc. (USPH) Upgraded to “Hold” by Zacks Investment Research” was originally published by Markets Daily and is the property of of Markets Daily. If you are viewing this piece of content on another website, it was copied illegally and republished in violation of international copyright & trademark legislation. The original version of this piece of content can be accessed at https://www.themarketsdaily.com/2017/04/22/u-s-physical-therapy-inc-usph-upgraded-to-hold-by-zacks-investment-research.html.

The company also recently declared a quarterly dividend, which will be paid on Friday, May 5th. Shareholders of record on Monday, April 17th will be issued a dividend of $0.20 per share. This represents a $0.80 annualized dividend and a yield of 1.25%. The ex-dividend date of this dividend is Wednesday, April 12th. This is a boost from U.S. Physical Therapy’s previous quarterly dividend of $0.17. U.S. Physical Therapy’s dividend payout ratio (DPR) is currently 35.05%.

Institutional investors have recently made changes to their positions in the company. Sei Investments Co. boosted its position in shares of U.S. Physical Therapy by 115.3% in the third quarter. Sei Investments Co. now owns 1,701 shares of the company’s stock worth $106,000 after buying an additional 911 shares during the period. Acrospire Investment Management LLC boosted its position in shares of U.S. Physical Therapy by 28.0% in the third quarter. Acrospire Investment Management LLC now owns 1,830 shares of the company’s stock worth $115,000 after buying an additional 400 shares during the period. Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC bought a new position in shares of U.S. Physical Therapy during the third quarter worth approximately $154,000. Tyers Asset Management LLC bought a new position in shares of U.S. Physical Therapy during the fourth quarter worth approximately $166,000. Finally, Municipal Employees Retirement System of Michigan boosted its position in shares of U.S. Physical Therapy by 1.5% in the third quarter. Municipal Employees Retirement System of Michigan now owns 2,770 shares of the company’s stock worth $174,000 after buying an additional 40 shares during the period. Hedge funds and other institutional investors own 96.70% of the company’s stock.

About U.S. Physical Therapy

U.S. Physical Therapy, Inc, through its subsidiaries, operates outpatient physical therapy clinics that provide pre-and post-operative care, and treatment for orthopedic-related disorders, sports-related injuries, preventative care, rehabilitation of injured workers and neurological-related injuries.

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Marshall’s School of Physical Therapy invites community to White Coat Ceremony


The Marshall University School of Physical Therapy will hold its 5th annual White Coat Ceremony and Presentation Day at 2:30 p.m. Friday, April 28, at the St. Mary’s Center for Education. The White Coat Ceremony is a rite of passage that marks the student’s transition into a clinical environment, according to Program Director Dr. Scott Davis.

 

“The white coat is a symbol of knowledge, training and trust,” Davis said. “It is the responsibility of all physical therapists to meet or exceed that standard by providing compassionate and skilled care,” Davis said. “During the ceremony, students will pledge to follow the American Physical Therapy Association’s Code of Ethics for Physical Therapists, affirming their commitment to the profession and their future patients.”

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said he hopes members of the university community will attend this year’s White Coat Ceremony as it exemplifies the continued growth and development of Marshall University.

“Five years ago, we established a program that would serve the growing need for more physical therapists in our region,” Prewitt said. “Today, with the help of amazing faculty and staff, we can successfully say we have contributed to one of the fastest growing professions in the country. We feel very privileged to be a part of this growth and change at Marshall and believe me, it doesn’t stop here.”

Thirty-seven students will receive their white coats during the ceremony. It will take place in the School of Physical Therapy at St. Mary’s Community Conference Room located at 2847 5th Avenue in Huntington.

To learn more about Marshall’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program, contact Davis at davis1090@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/physical-therapy.



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Twenty CSUN Physical Therapy Students Take the Field at Dodger Stadium


Growing up a few miles outside of Dodger Stadium, second-year California State University, Northridge physical therapy student James Choe spent many memorable days cheering on the Los Angeles Dodgers from the stands.

On April 18, Choe achieved a childhood dream when he was one of 20 CSUN physical therapy students in the renowned doctorate program honored at Dodger Stadium. These students were recognized for being recipients of the prestigious Roy and Roxie Campanella Scholarship. The scholarship is provided by the Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation and the Roy and Roxie Campanella Foundation every year to CSUN students in the Department of Physical Therapy.

The students walked on the field before the Dodgers played the Colorado Rockies and stood in front of loud cheers from more than 37,000 fans as an announcer listed off each of their names to the crowd.

“This was the closest I’ve ever been to the field,” Choe said. “I’m just speechless. The relationship the foundations have with the CSUN physical therapy department is special. The scholarship is for $1,000, so it was a significant portion that can help pay for tuition.”

Dodger legend Roy Campanella was injured in a car accident in 1958 that left him paralyzed from the neck down. After moving to the West Coast, he settled in the San Fernando Valley to pursue a second career in community relations for the Dodger organization. He also spent time mentoring young catchers during Spring Training for the Dodgers. He sought out physical therapy treatments to help him with his condition, which eventually led to his Campanella Foundation funding scholarships for physical therapy students.

“All my father cared about in terms of providing the scholarships was that he could reward and show his appreciation to students who were following their dreams of becoming physical therapists,” said Campanella’s daughter, Joni Campanella-Roan. “Physical therapists turned my dad’s life around and gave him the motivation to live. It meant everything to him to be able to provide an opportunity for people following in that field.”

Through the partnership between the Campanella Foundation and the Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation the number of recipients has grown by five every year since 2015, and is expected to grow to 25 by the fall. Campanella-Roan credited the increase to the success of CSUN’s physical therapy program.

“If my mother and father were alive today, they would be so thrilled to see how the number of recipients has grown,” Campanella-Roan said. “The program at CSUN provides [students] with so many tools. Adding five more recipients each year is such a great opportunity and I know it would mean the world to my parents.”

For honoree Catherine Soliva, the scholarship validated that her hard work throughout school has paid off.

“Having the support [from the scholarship] means a lot because it shows that so many people are behind us — parents, friends and now even the Dodgers,” Soliva said. “All of us here are very committed and excited about the profession.”

On top of the 20 scholarships provided to CSUN students, the Dodgers select one student from the program each year to intern with the team for eight weeks during Spring Training. This year’s intern, Ryan Yoshida, said the experience was incredible and extremely beneficial.

“I am very thankful for the opportunity through the CSUN physical therapy program,” Yoshida said. “I was able to learn so much and really gain an appreciation for the day-to-day events and work that go on with a Major League Baseball medical staff.”

Sharing in the students’ appreciation of the Roy and Roxie Campanella scholarship was College of Health and Human Development Dean Farrell Webb.

“I’m very grateful to the Dodgers organization and Joni [Campanella-Roan] because what they’ve done is more than just give scholarships to students,” Webb said. “They’ve opened up life opportunities, which is something very few people get.”

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Hospital’s dance class for kids offers physical therapy and fun


Hospital’s dance class for kids offers physical therapy and fun

CLOSE

Dance Unlimited allows children with a variety of diagnoses to attend physical therapy while enjoying a fun class with other students.
HUMANKIND

AKRON, OH — Walk into a Dance Unlimited class at Akron’s Children’s Hospital, and you’ll be sure to see smiling faces and excited students.

The program was created by former Cleveland Cavalier cheerleader and now physical therapist, Kellie Lightfoot. The class replaces typical physical therapy sessions for kids dealing with various diagnoses, including Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism.

Initially just one class with 13 dancers, Lightfoot now teaches three classes with 60+ students.  The kids learn a variety of dance styles including ballet, contemporary, jazz and hip hop.

The end result? Confidence, happiness, and some pretty cool dance moves.

***

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Physical therapist sees dream become reality | News


Ever since he finished college, Troy Herrman has worked in physical therapy.

It’s the profession he’s loved and enjoyed, simply for the aspect of helping people heal. Herrman wouldn’t have had it any other way for the past 18 years.

“I think the most rewarding aspect of physical therapy is watching someone become themselves again,” Herrman said. “We deal with individuals when they are hurting, they’re down, and it’s not their normal self. You get to work with these individuals and build them up and watch them improve. In the process they become a healthier version of themselves. That’s special when that happens.”

Along that path, Herrman has had a dream of opening his own business. After a month of putting a new work place together, he finally was able to see a goal he set for himself years ago come to fruition. On Monday morning, his own business, Herrman Physical Therapy and Wellness opened to the public. It is located at 2707 Broadway Ave. in Hays.

Up until late Easter evening Sunday, Herrman and family members — including his father-in-law and brother-in-law — worked to get the place ready to be open.

“They’ve been a huge help,” Hermann said of his family. “I couldn’t have done it without them.”

A native of Ensign, Herrman graduated from Fort Hays State University, then from the University of Kansas in 1999. He and his family have been in Hays for the past 10 years. He worked at Hays Medical Center as a staff physical therapist, then managed the outpatient rehabilitation department for four years. In the next six years he was a physical therapist at Koerner Chiropractic.

Through the years, Herrman has built strong relationships through work and confidence in himself. He never let the hope of owning his own business elude him. The timing to do it now seemed right.

“I think the biggest thing I’ve gained as far as confidence is just that ability to communicate and bond with individuals, so that they know, ‘Hey, I know I’m going to be OK again,’ ” Herrman said.

The business is staffed by just himself and his front area assistant Mariah Legleiter. Herrman plans to eventually employ at least a few other individuals. For now though, it’s just about establishing the business and relationships with patients. Down the road everything else, he hopes, will fall into place.

“I want people to know they have a choice for physical therapy,” Herrman said. “When patients come here, they will see me every time and it will be a positive experience.”



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U.S. Physical Therapy Inc Stock Volatility Hits A Deteriorated Level





Stock Alert – But Not What You Might Think


Before we cover the full analysis we make a quick alert here that U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) has seen its stock price move at a deteriorated level. We’ll go through the details below — but that’s the lede — the stock has been unusally quiet. If there was a post it note to summarize the stock movement in the last 30-days it would likely read “quiet time… too quiet?” The HV20 is 28.25% verus the HV20 of the S&P 500 at 6.43%.

Another bit to this alert of quiet time, which we cover in the article, is that while the historical volatility may be a deteriorated level, the real question that needs to be answered for option traders is not if the HV20 is low, but rather if the implied volatility that is priced for the next 30-days accuratley reflects what we’re about to see in the stock for the next month.

To jump forward and examine if owning or shorting options has been a positive trade in U.S. Physical Therapy Inc, you can go here: Getting serious about option trading.

PREFACE


This is a proprietary realized volatility rating created by Capital Market Laboratories (CMLviz) based on a large number of data interactions for U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) . We examine
the little used gem of daily stock volatility over a 20-day and 30-day trading period, as well as comparisons to the last year and the actual stock returns over the last three- and six-months
and the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 indices.

Option trading isn’t about luck — this three minute video will change your trading life forever: Option Trading and Truth




As a heads up, in the “Why This Matters” section at the end of this article on U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) , we’re going to take a step back and show really clearly
that there is actually a lot less “luck” in successful option trading than most people are aware of. This idea of an “option trading expert” is vastly over complicated
so those with the information advantage can continue to profit at the expense of the rest.

But before that, let’s turn back to USPH. Here are the exact steps that led us to this rating, and whether it’s a risk alert or a holding pattern.

USPH Recent Stock Volatility








Rating


Stock volatility using proprietary measures has hit a deteriorated level.



While stocks with USPH’s profile see a short-term quiet period, this is also one of those times
when a shake out volatility move could be on the horizon.
Let’s take a deep dive into some institutional level volatility measures for U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) .

U.S. Physical Therapy Inc Stock Performance


USPH is down -6.9% over the last three months and up +2.5% over the last six months. The stock price is up +27.3% over the last year. The current stock price is $64.


USPH Step 1: Stock Returns



The one-year stock return does not impact the volatility rating since we are looking at a shorter time horizon. However, the rating does examine the 3-month returns and the
absolute difference between the 3-month and 6-month returns.

  The 3-month stock return of -6.9% is too small to impact the stock volatility rating for USPH.
  The small difference between the 3-month and 6-month stock returns does not impact the stock volatility rating for USPH.



USPH Step 2: Daily Stock Volatility Level


The HV30® takes the stock’s day to day historical volatility over the last 30-days and then annualizes it. The HV20 looks back over just 20-days — a shorter time period. Here is the breakdown for U.S. Physical Therapy Inc (NYSE:USPH) and how the day-by-day stock historical volatilities have impacted the rating:

  The HV20 of 21.7% is low enough that it has a downward impact on USPH’s volatility rating.

USPH Step 3: U.S. Physical Therapy Inc HV20 Compared to Indices


* The HV20 for USPH is substantially larger than that for both the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ 100 which raises the volatility rating.

* The HV20 for USPH is substantially larger than that for the Health Care ETF (XLV) which raises the volatility rating.

Here is summary data in tabular and chart format.



           USPH
           HV20    
   S&P 500
HV20
   NASDAQ 100
HV20   
   XLV
HV20   
           21.7%    6.43%    6.07%    5.57%





USPH Step 4: Daily Volatility Percentiles and Highs

We also examine the annual high of the HV30 in our rating but in this case the 52 week high in HV30 for USPH is 34.5%,
which is not enough to impact the stock volatility rating.

Here is summary data in tabular and chart format.



           USPH
           HV20    
   USPH
HV30
   USPH
HV30 High   
           21.7%    28.3%    34.5%





Final Stock Volatility Percentile Level: USPH


The final evolution of the volatility rating for U.S. Physical Therapy Inc is a comparison of the HV30 value relative to its past, which is neatly summarized in the percentile — a scoring mechanism that goes from a low of 1 to a high of 100.

 
The HV30 percentile for U.S. Physical Therapy Inc is 68%, which means the stock has seen elevated volatile price movement relative to its own past and
that has a small impact on the stock volatility rating.



U.S. Physical Therapy Inc Realized Volatility Percentiles



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